THE DYNAMIC WORKS OF PHIL HALE

Phil Hale has been involved in the contemporary art scene for a few decades now. His impressive resume shows he has had his hand in many creative endeavors including illustrations in magazines, book covers, portrait commissions, and gallery shows. Even without the knowledge of his success, prestige and credibility as a leading figure in representational figurative art, one is able to understand the brilliance and genius of this man just by viewing his works. His work is careful and deliberate but manages to find its way into a realm of expressiveness typically saved for abstract artists.

There are several themes and styles Phil has explored over the course of his career, most notably a series of dark, fragmented pieces conveying devastation, impending doom, and distress. This series, Life Wants to Live, was showcased at the Jonathon Levine Gallery in New York this past February. The striking images he created with oil provide an unsettling showcasing of the unreliability of recounting events and narratives. If you look carefully, you can see the influence of photography in these fragmented pieces.  There is a suggestion of a story; but his real but expressive way of applying paint allows for room for interpretation- a glimpse of a stressful scene combining figure and debris with spontaneous abstraction. This isn’t art for the weak, or those looking to be comforted.

Phil’s past work’s includes dynamic, colorful portraits and figurative work showing his talent for creating raw, real, and captivating paintings. His abilities shine through with his inclination to not only emulate the human form, but to manipulate it and make it come to life with the help of expert handling of oil paint. Movement and complexity are the themes Phil pulls off exceptionally well. His figures are rarely stagnant and always enchanting.

Beastman aka Brad Eastman is a husband, father and well known visual artist from Sydney, Australia. With an overwhelming desire to slow down and absorb inspiration from somewhere new, Brad Eastman and his family made the decision to pack up their lives in Sydney and relocate to Bali for a little while.

Anastasia Kopittseva was born in Russia in 1987. She studied at the Moscow Academic Art Lyceum of the Russian Academy of Arts and in the All-Russian State University of Cinematography and the British Higher School of Art and Design.

This new music video for composer Ralf Hildenbeutel's track Disco was created from over 1,200 individually hand-painted frames. Directed by Boris Seewald, the clip uses an animation technique called rotoscoping to turn the real-life movements of dancers Althea Corlett and Simone Schmidt into a series of drawings and paintings to make each scene.

Rino Stefano Tagliafierro is an Italian experimental animator and director based in Milan. His output includes music videos and fashion videos. In addition to collaborating with teams and video artists creating interactive video projections for exhibitions, museums and special events, he has participated in many festivals and competitions, and has received numerous international awards in recognition of his work.