THE PORTRAITURE OF TRISTAN PIGOTT

THE PORTRAITURE OF TRISTAN PIGOTT

Tristan Pigott‘s work is incredibly striking, provocative, and awkward. These oil paintings are blatant reflections of contemporary youth culture, revealing the careful narcissism of selfies and social media. The concept of portraiture is intertwined with the curated nature of the presentation of the self. Tristan is a British artist who takes traditional portraiture and turns it on its head, making calculated distortions from interesting perspectives to let personalities and personas shine through. The way he portrays his subjects, who are often his friends, is not necessarily flattering. (With no filter, so to speak.)

This could be defined as the new age of portraiture- an era of complex, contemporary interpretations combined with traditional applications. Tristan approaches sexuality, discomfort, and interpersonal relationships with humor and complexity. These snapshots caught in time have a distinct style and color palette, depicted honestly with a tinge of surrealism. The scenes, which are often references from photographs, harbor strange narratives and satirical undertones while remaining unremarkable in nature. Depicting everyday objects, situations, and people, something remarkable happens when Tristan pulls the scene together with surrealistic backgrounds and realistic figures.


Indefinite means something that lasts for an unknown or unstated length of time. This projects shows struggles and fighting through a series of contemporary photographies which hopefully any viewer can relate to.

Anatomy of Melancholy' Album artwork for Jan Swerts Concept by Jan Swerts The album contains a serie songs driven by melancholy.. Each song is dedicated to one of Jan's heroes, who's work also has a tendency towards melancholy. The booklet contains a serie corresponding portraits.

This new music video for composer Ralf Hildenbeutel's track Disco was created from over 1,200 individually hand-painted frames. Directed by Boris Seewald, the clip uses an animation technique called rotoscoping to turn the real-life movements of dancers Althea Corlett and Simone Schmidt into a series of drawings and paintings to make each scene.

Imagine a “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure” type situation where a young punk rock kid from Brooklyn finds himself time traveling back to 17th century Holland and stumbles into the painting studio of one of the classic Dutch Masters. Accepting this odd twist of fate, he dutifully studies the teachings and techniques of his mentor and eventually breaks out on his own, painting images of his earlier life in the future. Pure fiction perhaps, but the result is all real. Dan Witz has been painting just such work in his New York studio for decades. Masterfully composed scenes of epic mosh pits pieced together from reference photos take by the artist himself at punk-rock shows are painted with the detail and delicacy he cultivated during his studies as a classical painter.