Tiffany Bozic

Tiffany Bozic has spent the majority of her life living with and observing the intricacies of nature. Her work has the traditional air of tightly rendered nature illustrations but with a highly emotional range of surreal metaphorical themes. In her paintings and sketches she presents her vision of life’s struggles and triumphs that are largely autobiographical.  Her wide array of subjects are inspired both from her extensive travels to wild places, and the research specimens at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, CA. Over the years, Bozic has developed a complex process of masking and staining so the natural grain can collaborate with each composition using multiple layers of watered down acrylic paint on maple panels of wood.  She has had several solo exhibitions featuring her large-scale paintings and installations. Her work has also been included in numerous group shows across the country, and spoken at international events. She was also the first ‘Artist in Residency’ whereby she collaborated with the California Academy of Sciences, to create the “From the Depths” exhibit on the public floor of the museum, November 2007. Bozic is a self-taught artist currently living and working in her cottage under the redwood trees in Marin, CA

Artist Statement My latest paintings drawings and objects respond to two concerns.

British artist Jonathan Yeo (b. London, 18 December 1970) is one of the world’s leading portrait artists.

Tristan Pigott‘s work is incredibly striking, provocative, and awkward. These oil paintings are blatant reflections of contemporary youth culture, revealing the careful narcissism of selfies and social media. The concept of portraiture is intertwined with the curated nature of the presentation of the self. Tristan is a British artist who takes traditional portraiture and turns it on its head, making calculated distortions from interesting perspectives to let personalities and personas shine through. The way he portrays his subjects, who are often his friends, is not necessarily flattering. (With no filter, so to speak.)

Imagine a “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure” type situation where a young punk rock kid from Brooklyn finds himself time traveling back to 17th century Holland and stumbles into the painting studio of one of the classic Dutch Masters. Accepting this odd twist of fate, he dutifully studies the teachings and techniques of his mentor and eventually breaks out on his own, painting images of his earlier life in the future. Pure fiction perhaps, but the result is all real. Dan Witz has been painting just such work in his New York studio for decades. Masterfully composed scenes of epic mosh pits pieced together from reference photos take by the artist himself at punk-rock shows are painted with the detail and delicacy he cultivated during his studies as a classical painter.